Top 15 gram negative rod uti treatment in 2022

Below are the best information and knowledge on the subject gram negative rod uti treatment compiled and compiled by our own team oanhthai:

1. Antimicrobial susceptibilities of aerobic and facultative gram-negative bacilli isolated from Chinese patients with urinary tract infections between 2010 and 2014 – BMC Infectious Diseases

Author: bmcinfectdis.biomedcentral.com

Date Submitted: 07/17/2020 02:28 AM

Average star voting: 5 ⭐ ( 36780 reviews)

Summary: The objective of this study was to investigate the distribution and susceptibility of aerobic and facultative Gram-negative bacilli isolated from Chinese patients with UTIs collected within 48 h (community acquired, CA) or after 48 h (hospital acquired, HA) of hospital admission. From 2010 to 2014, the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of 12 antibiotics for 4,332 aerobic and facultative Gram-negative bacilli, sampled in 21 hospitals in 16 cities, were determined by the broth microdilution method. Enterobacteriaceae composed 88.5% of the total isolates, with Escherichia coli (E. coli) (63.2%) the most commonly isolated species, followed by Klebsiella pneumoniae (K. pneumoniae) (12.2%). Non-Enterobacteriaceae accounted for only 11.5% of all isolates and included mainly Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) (6.9%) and Acinetobacter baumannii (A. baumannii) (3.3%). Among the antimicrobial agents tested, the susceptibility rates of E.coli to the two carbapenems, ertapenem and imipenem as well as amikacin and piperacillin-tazobactam ranged from 92.5 to 98.7%. Against K. pneumonia, the most potent antibiotics were imipenem (92.6% susceptibility), amikacin (89.2% susceptibility) and ertapenem (87.9% susceptibility). Although non-Enterobacteriaceae did not show high susceptibilities to the 12 common antibiotics, amikacin exhibited the highest in vitro activity against P. aeruginosa over the 5-year study period, followed by piperacillin-tazobactam, imipenem, ceftazidime, cefepime, ciprofloxacin, and levofloxacin. The Extended Spectrum Beta-Lactamase (ESBL) rates decreased slowly during the 5 years in E. coli from 68.6% in 2010 to 59.1% in 2014, in K. pneumoniae from 59.7 to 49.2%, and in Proteus mirabilis (P. mirabilis) from 40.0 to 26.1%. However, the ESBL rates were different in 5 regions of China (Northeast, North, East, South and Middle-China). E. coli and K. pneumonia were the major pathogens causing UTIs and carbapenems and amikacin retained the highest susceptibility rates over the 5-year study period, indicating that they are good drug choices for empirical therapies, particularly of CA UTIs in China.

Match with the search results: Carbapenems remain the most effective antimicrobial agents against UTI Gram-negative pathogens…. read more

Antimicrobial susceptibilities of aerobic and facultative gram-negative bacilli isolated from Chinese patients with urinary tract infections between 2010 and 2014 - BMC Infectious Diseases

2. Susceptibility of community Gram-negative urinary tract isolates to mecillinam and other oral agents

Author: www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov

Date Submitted: 04/30/2019 05:36 PM

Average star voting: 4 ⭐ ( 49924 reviews)

Summary:

Match with the search results: Recent guidelines from the Infectious Disease Society of America (6) have recommended three days of treatment with trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole or trimethoprim ……. read more

Susceptibility of community Gram-negative urinary tract isolates to mecillinam and other oral agents

3. A Pattern of Antibiotic Resistance in Gram-Negative Rods Causing Urinary Tract Infection in Adults

Author: www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov

Date Submitted: 11/22/2021 07:47 PM

Average star voting: 3 ⭐ ( 69665 reviews)

Summary:

Match with the search results: Our study has shown 10.7% resistance of gram-negative rods to fosfomycin, one of the least commonly used antibiotics for UTI. It shows better ……. read more

A Pattern of Antibiotic Resistance in Gram-Negative Rods Causing Urinary Tract Infection in Adults

4. Urinary Tract Infections in Adults

Author: www.aafp.org

Date Submitted: 01/25/2020 10:02 PM

Average star voting: 4 ⭐ ( 20433 reviews)

Summary: Urinary tract infections remain a significant cause of morbidity in all age groups. Recent studies have helped to better define the population groups at risk for these infections, as well as the most cost-effective management strategies. Initially, a urinary tract infection should be categorized as complicated or uncomplicated. Further categorization of the infection by clinical syndrome and by host (i.e., acute cystitis in young women, acute pyelonephritis, catheter-related infection, infection in men, asymptomatic bacteriuria in the elderly) helps the physician determine the appropriate diagnostic and management strategies. Uncomplicated urinary tract infections are caused by a predictable group of susceptible organisms. These infections can be empirically treated without the need for urine cultures. The most effective therapy for an uncomplicated infection is a three-day course of trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. Complicated infections are diagnosed by quantitative urine cultures and require a more prolonged course of therapy. Asymptomatic bacteriuria rarely requires treatment and is not associated with increased morbidity in elderly patients.

Match with the search results: Unlike single-dose antibiotic therapy, a three-day regimen reduces rectal carriage of gram-negative bacteria and is not associated with a ……. read more

Urinary Tract Infections in Adults

5. Complicated urinary tract infections: practical solutions for the treatment of multiresistant Gram-negative bacteria

Author: www.uptodate.com

Date Submitted: 10/05/2019 07:14 PM

Average star voting: 5 ⭐ ( 56982 reviews)

Summary: Abstract. Resistance in Gram-negative bacteria has been increasing, particularly over the last 6 years. This is mainly due to the spread of strains producing ex

Match with the search results: Acinetobacter infection: Epidemiology, microbiology, pathogenesis, clinical features, and diagnosis · Acinetobacter infection: Treatment and prevention ……. read more

Complicated urinary tract infections: practical solutions for the treatment of multiresistant Gram-negative bacteria

6. Resistant Gram-Negative Urinary Tract Bacterial Infections | IntechOpen

Author: www.uptodate.com

Date Submitted: 08/05/2020 04:39 PM

Average star voting: 5 ⭐ ( 70086 reviews)

Summary: Urinary tract infection (UTI) is one of the most common infections in both the community as well in hospital settings. It is mostly caused by Gram-negative bacteria (GNBs). Over the past two decades,

Match with the search results: Urinary tract infections (UTIs) include cystitis (infection of the … and also includes other gram-negative bacilli (eg, Pseudomonas), ……. read more

Resistant Gram-Negative Urinary Tract Bacterial Infections | IntechOpen

7. Urinary Tract Infections: Causes and Treatment Update

Author: academic.oup.com

Date Submitted: 10/07/2021 06:11 AM

Average star voting: 5 ⭐ ( 60746 reviews)

Summary:

Match with the search results: Resistance in Gram-negative bacteria has been increasing, … practical solutions for the treatment of multiresistant Gram-negative bacteria….. read more

Urinary Tract Infections: Causes and Treatment Update

8. Which medications in the drug class Antibiotics are used in the treatment of Urinary Tract Infection (UTI) in Males?

Author: www.intechopen.com

Date Submitted: 05/28/2021 12:37 AM

Average star voting: 3 ⭐ ( 38831 reviews)

Summary: AntibioticsEmpiric antimicrobial therapy must be comprehensive and should cover all likely pathogens in the context of the clinical setting.Ciprofloxacin (Cipro)Ciprofloxacin is a fluoroquinolone with… more

Match with the search results: Common combination regimens include tigecycline, carbapenem, minocycline, rifampicin, aminoglycosides, ampicillin/sulbactam, and piperacillin-tazobactam. Large ……. read more

Which medications in the drug class Antibiotics are used in the treatment of Urinary Tract Infection (UTI) in Males?

9. Urinary Tract Infection (UTI) and Cystitis (Bladder Infection) in Females Medication: Sulfonamides, Antibiotics, Other, Fluoroquinolones, Penicillins, Amino, Cephalosporins, Second Generation, Cephalo

Author: www.uspharmacist.com

Date Submitted: 08/26/2019 06:29 PM

Average star voting: 3 ⭐ ( 88012 reviews)

Summary: Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are common in females, accounting for over 6 million patient visits to physicians per year in the United States. Cystitis (bladder infection) represents the majority of these infections (see the image below).

Match with the search results: Two new IV antibiotics (Zerbaxa, Avycaz) have the potential to overcome some of the antibiotic resistance noted with oral medications. Both of ……. read more

Urinary Tract Infection (UTI) and Cystitis (Bladder Infection) in Females Medication: Sulfonamides, Antibiotics, Other, Fluoroquinolones, Penicillins, Amino, Cephalosporins, Second Generation, Cephalo

10. The Antibiotic Resistance Pattern of Gram-Negative Bacteria in Children Younger Than 24 Months with a Urinary Tract Infection: A Retrospective Single-Center Study over 15 Consecutive Years

Author: www.merckmanuals.com

Date Submitted: 02/12/2021 10:43 AM

Average star voting: 3 ⭐ ( 80469 reviews)

Summary:

Match with the search results: Treatment is with antibiotics and removal of any urinary tract catheters and obstructions. … Enteric, usually gram-negative aerobic bacteria (most often)….. read more

The Antibiotic Resistance Pattern of Gram-Negative Bacteria in Children Younger Than 24 Months with a Urinary Tract Infection: A Retrospective Single-Center Study over 15 Consecutive Years

11. Gram-positive uropathogens: Empirical treatment and emerging antimicrobial resistance

Author: www.medscape.com

Date Submitted: 07/17/2019 08:18 PM

Average star voting: 3 ⭐ ( 48076 reviews)

Summary: OA Text is an independent open-access scientific publisher showcases innovative research and ideas aimed at improving health by linking research and practice to the benefit of society.

Match with the search results: Carbapenems remain the most effective antimicrobial agents against UTI Gram-negative pathogens…. read more

Gram-positive uropathogens: Empirical treatment and emerging antimicrobial resistance

12. Increasing relevance of Gram-positive cocci in urinary tract infections: a 10-year analysis of their prevalence and resistance trends | Scientific Reports

Author: emedicine.medscape.com

Date Submitted: 06/03/2020 11:05 PM

Average star voting: 5 ⭐ ( 63766 reviews)

Summary: Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are the third most common types of infection in human medicine worldwide. There is increasing appreciation for the pathogenic role of Gram-positive cocci (GPC) in UTIs, as they have a plethora of virulence factors, maintaining their pathogenicity and high affinity for the epithelial cells of the urinary tract. The study was carried out using microbiological data collected corresponding to the period between 2008 and 2017. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed using the disk diffusion method and E-tests. The age range of patients affected from the outpatient and inpatient groups differed significantly (43 [range 0.7–99] vs. 68 [range 0.4–99] years; p = 0.008). 3962 GPCs were obtained from inpatient and 4358 from outpatient samples, corresponding to 20.5 ± 2.8% (range 17.5–26.8%) and 20.6 ± 2.6% (range 17.8–26.0%) of all positive urine samples (p > 0.05); in both groups, Enterococcus spp. were the most prevalent (outpatients: 79.6%; inpatients: 88.5%). High-level aminoglycoside resistance in enterococci was noted in 31.0–46.6% of cases. A pronounced increase in the number of MRSA was seen in the second half of the study period (0.6–1.9% vs. 9.8–11.6%; p = 0.038). The ratio of VRE isolates was 0.16%, no VISA/VRSA isolates were detected.

Match with the search results: Recent guidelines from the Infectious Disease Society of America (6) have recommended three days of treatment with trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole or trimethoprim ……. read more

Increasing relevance of Gram-positive cocci in urinary tract infections: a 10-year analysis of their prevalence and resistance trends | Scientific Reports

13. Treatment of Infections Due to MDR Gram-Negative Bacteria

Author: chikd.org

Date Submitted: 11/20/2020 03:38 AM

Average star voting: 3 ⭐ ( 90555 reviews)

Summary: The treatment of multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria (MDR-GNB) infections in critically ill patients presents many challenges. Since an effective treatment should be administered as soon as possible, resistance to many antimicrobial classes almost invariably reduces the probability of adequate empirical coverage, with possible unfavorable consequences. In this light, readily available patient’s medical history and updated information about the local microbiological epidemiology remain critical for defining the baseline risk of MDR-GNB infections and firmly guiding empirical treatment choices, with the aim of avoiding both undertreatment and overtreatment. Rapid diagnostics and efficient laboratory workflows are also of paramount importance both for anticipating diagnosis and for rapidly narrowing the antimicrobial spectrum, with de-escalation purposes and in line with antimicrobial stewardship principles. Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Acinetobacter baumannii are being reported with increasing frequencies worldwide, although with important variability across regions, hospitals and even single wards. In the past few years, new treatment options, such as ceftazidime/avibactam, meropenem/vaborbactam, ceftolozane/tazobactam, and plazomicin have become available, and others will become soon, which have provide some much awaited resources for effectively counteracting severe infections due to these organisms. However, their optimal use should be guaranteed in the long term, for delaying as much as possible the emergence and diffusion of resistance to novel agents. Despite important progresses, PK/PD optimization of dosages and treatment duration in critically ill patients has still some areas of uncertainty requiring further study, that should take into account also resistance selection as a major endpoint. Treatment of severe MDR-GNB infections in critically ill patients in the near future will require an expert and complex clinical reasoning, of course taking into account the peculiar characteristics of the target population, but also the need for adequate empirical coverage and the more and more specific enzyme-level activity of novel antimicrobials with respect to the different resistance mechanisms of MDR-GNB.

Match with the search results: Our study has shown 10.7% resistance of gram-negative rods to fosfomycin, one of the least commonly used antibiotics for UTI. It shows better ……. read more

Treatment of Infections Due to MDR Gram-Negative Bacteria

14. Gram-Negative Infections Successfully Treated with Ceftazidime-Avibactam

Author: www.unmc.edu

Date Submitted: 08/20/2019 10:10 AM

Average star voting: 4 ⭐ ( 39030 reviews)

Summary: Gram-negative bacteria can cause infections, are resistant to multiple drugs, and are increasingly resistant to most available antibiotics, the CDC says.

Match with the search results: Unlike single-dose antibiotic therapy, a three-day regimen reduces rectal carriage of gram-negative bacteria and is not associated with a ……. read more

Gram-Negative Infections Successfully Treated with Ceftazidime-Avibactam

15. Gram Negative Infection – an overview | ScienceDirect Topics

Author: www.oatext.com

Date Submitted: 07/26/2021 12:38 PM

Average star voting: 4 ⭐ ( 31703 reviews)

Summary:

Match with the search results: Acinetobacter infection: Epidemiology, microbiology, pathogenesis, clinical features, and diagnosis · Acinetobacter infection: Treatment and prevention ……. read more

Gram Negative Infection - an overview | ScienceDirect Topics

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